Programme

The 2019 Water and Development Congress & Exhibition will show leadership in thinking and connect strategy with solutions.

  • Drinking Water Treatment and Supply Drinking Water Treatment and Supply
  • Fecal Sludge and Wastewater Treatment for Resource Recovery Fecal Sludge and Wastewater Treatment for Resource Recovery
  • City Water and Fecal Sludge Utility Management and Services City Water and Fecal Sludge Utility Management and Services
  • Integrated Water Resource Management Integrated Water Resource Management
  • Efforts Toward SDG Goal 6 Efforts Toward SDG Goal 6

Sunday 1 December

Registration10:00 - 11:30
Coffee Break12:00 - 13:30
Lunch14:30 - 16:00
16:30 - 18:30
18:30 - 20:00
Room 1
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Chair: Kirsten de Vette, IWA

Young Water Professionals have innovative ideas, new ways of thinking, and many of them are taking up leadership positions within their organisations, but are often not yet invited to contribute as experts yet. At the same time there are some YWPs that still find it difficult to stand up in a crowd (with seniors) to contribute to the discussion, even though they have an opinion that matters.

This forum provides an enabling platform for them to contribute to the Congress. At the same time, as a forum run by and for young and emerging water professionals, a selected number (volunteers) will gain experience in organizing and facilitating a forum, including how to synthesize and workshop ‘big questions’. This will form an invaluable contribution to the outcome report of the Congress (that we have been responsible for over the last 4 years).

Many emerging economies face significant challenges in the provision and management of water. YWP’s of today will either benefit from or suffer the consequences of decisions and responses made in the sector today, and especially in developing countries where there are opportunities for ‘leap-frogging’ emerging economies in how water is treated, managed and used. The YWP’s of today are the leaders of tomorrow and their opinions, ideas and even concerns need to be aired. This forum offers such an opportunity.



2019-12-01 10:00:00 2019-12-01 11:30:00Asia/ColomboIWA Emerging Leaders ForumIWA Emerging Leaders ForumRoom 1IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Chair: Kirsten de Vette, IWA

Young Water Professionals have innovative ideas, new ways of thinking, and many of them are taking up leadership positions within their organisations, but are often not yet invited to contribute as experts yet. At the same time there are some YWPs that still find it difficult to stand up in a crowd (with seniors) to contribute to the discussion, even though they have an opinion that matters.

This forum provides an enabling platform for them to contribute to the Congress. At the same time, as a forum run by and for young and emerging water professionals, a selected number (volunteers) will gain experience in organizing and facilitating a forum, including how to synthesize and workshop ‘big questions’. This will form an invaluable contribution to the outcome report of the Congress (that we have been responsible for over the last 4 years).

Many emerging economies face significant challenges in the provision and management of water. YWP’s of today will either benefit from or suffer the consequences of decisions and responses made in the sector today, and especially in developing countries where there are opportunities for ‘leap-frogging’ emerging economies in how water is treated, managed and used. The YWP’s of today are the leaders of tomorrow and their opinions, ideas and even concerns need to be aired. This forum offers such an opportunity.



2019-12-01 12:00:00 2019-12-01 13:30:00Asia/ColomboIWA Emerging Leaders ForumIWA Emerging Leaders ForumRoom 1IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Chair: Amber Abrams,Future Water Institute University of Cape Town, South Africa

To inform natural scientists engineers and other water professionals of the many ways in which qualitative social science methods can complement ecological and quantitative research efforts to understand water-related problems. This workshop will therefore highlight some of the many different qualitative techniques that can be employed to understand and improve water-related research. Although presentations will be included the workshop will emphasise at the end of each presentation discussion with the audience in order that we can learn from each other about our experiences and questions related to using these methods. Three different methods will also be work shopped so that participants can engage in the methods and experience them first-hand.


2019-12-01 14:30:00 2019-12-01 16:00:00Asia/ColomboIt's Complicated: The Need For Social Science And Engaged Qualitative Methods In Water-related ResearchIt's Complicated: The Need For Social Science And Engaged Qualitative Methods In Water-related ResearchRoom 1IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
 
2019-12-01 16:30:00 2019-12-01 18:30:00Asia/ColomboOpening CeremonyOpening CeremonyRoom 1IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
 
2019-12-01 18:30:00 2019-12-01 20:00:00Asia/ColomboWelcome ReceptionWelcome ReceptionRoom 1IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
Room 2

Chair: Rui Malheiro, IWA

AquaRating focuses the challenges water and sanitation services providers face in a comprehensive way evaluating their performance through indicators and management practices establishing an international standard and relying on information verified by independent auditors accredited by the AquaRating Entity. 

The basic goal of the rating system is evaluating the water and sanitation services in an integrated way through 112 assessment elements organized in 8 areas providing a rating in each one of them -- as a result of rating each and every single of their compounding elements -- to get aggregated in a unique mark (from 0 to 100 and called AquaRating) for the utility. This way AquaRating avoids the simplistic message of the single rating allowing at the same time having a quick view of the utility areas with improvement potential.

The reliability of the results is secured by the International Water Association and the Inter-American Development Bank that validate the data uplo



2019-12-01 10:00:00 2019-12-01 11:30:00Asia/ColomboUtilities Change Management: AquaRating Success StoriesUtilities Change Management: AquaRating Success StoriesRoom 2IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Chair: Ratish Menon, SCMS Water Institute Kochi, India

Today water utilities and the populations they serve are facing a range of dynamic regional and global pressures such as climate change population growth urbanization deterioration of urban infrastructure systems and more. The water industry and in particular urban water utilities needs to adapt to respond to these challenges and digital technologies could be transformational in positioning the water sector and their customers for increased resilience.

This workshop will explore how digitalization is reshaping the water sector and enabling urban services to seamlessly connect through their value chain. The workshop will have practical examples of utilities digital journeys exploring how a problem has been sorted how digital technologies had a role in solving the problem what was the business case the barriers that were overcome and the benefits for users obtained.


2019-12-01 12:00:00 2019-12-01 13:30:00Asia/ColomboWater Rose Diagram As A Metric For Urban Water SecurityWater Rose Diagram As A Metric For Urban Water SecurityRoom 2IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
 

Chair: Jan Hennings, Cranfield University, United Kingdom

Technology innovation is an important aspect of the effort in addressing the challenges in development. Testing is a crucial yet often under-explored aspect of Product Development (PD). It is rarely understood in its entirety let alone considered during the initial planning phase. The proposed session aims to use a tool that helps technology developers communicate understand and focus their testing efforts (see below) to practice the planning of testing activities for PD projects to explore its utility and to harness the participants' experience to further improve it. Through presentation of the tool and its development process to date and by actively using it in a group exercise participants explore the importance of testing in technology innovation and pitfalls in planning and communicating testing activities.


2019-12-01 14:30:00 2019-12-01 16:00:00Asia/ColomboPrototype Testing In Technology Development -- Using A Strategic Tool To Focus And Communicate Testing ActivitiesPrototype Testing In Technology Development -- Using A Strategic Tool To Focus And Communicate Testing ActivitiesRoom 2IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Monday 2 December

09:00 - 09:45
Coffee break10:30 - 12:00
Lunch13:30 - 15:00
Break15:30 - 17:00
Break17:15 - 18:00
Room 1 
2019-12-02 09:00:00 2019-12-02 09:45:00Asia/ColomboKeynote PlenaryKeynote PlenaryRoom 1IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Chair: Water Board, SriLanka


2019-12-02 10:30:00 2019-12-02 12:00:00Asia/ColomboResearch & Development ForumResearch & Development ForumRoom 1IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Chair: Water Board, SriLanka


2019-12-02 13:30:00 2019-12-02 15:00:00Asia/ColomboResearch & Development ForumResearch & Development ForumRoom 1IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Chair: Water Board, SriLanka


2019-12-02 15:30:00 2019-12-02 17:00:00Asia/ColomboResearch & Development ForumResearch & Development ForumRoom 1IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
 
2019-12-02 17:15:00 2019-12-02 18:00:00Asia/ColomboKeynote PlenaryKeynote PlenaryRoom 1IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
Room 2

Chair: Corinne Trommsdorff, IWA



2019-12-02 10:30:00 2019-12-02 12:00:00Asia/ColomboUtililty Leaders Forum Utililty Leaders Forum Room 2IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Chair: Corinne Trommsdorff, IWA


2019-12-02 13:30:00 2019-12-02 15:00:00Asia/ColomboUtililty Leaders Forum Utililty Leaders Forum Room 2IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Chair: Corinne Trommsdorff, IWA



2019-12-02 15:30:00 2019-12-02 17:00:00Asia/ColomboUtility Leaders ForumUtility Leaders ForumRoom 2IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
Room 3
2019-12-02 10:30:00 2019-12-02 12:00:00Asia/ColomboGroundwater treatmentGroundwater treatmentRoom 3IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

2019-12-02 13:30:00 2019-12-02 15:00:00Asia/ColomboGroundwater Management and GovernanceGroundwater Management and GovernanceRoom 3IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Cost Effective In-line Filtration System To Improve Water Quality In Rainwater Tanks. Saravanamuthu Vigneswaran, Australia

Smart Water Monitoring Technology: Measure To Manage. Jessica Fell, South Africa

Soil Moisture Profile Of Bioretention Basins During Antecedent Dry Days. Daniel Subramaniam, Sri Lanka

Sand Dams: Storing Harvested Rainwater Or Recharging Aquifers?. Alison Parker, United Kingdom



2019-12-02 15:30:00 2019-12-02 17:00:00Asia/ColomboRainwater Harvest Management and TreatmentRainwater Harvest Management and TreatmentRoom 3IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
Room 4

Chair: Lieke Friederichs, National Inst Public Health and Environment, The Netherlands

AMR is a critical global health problem increasingly shown to be determined by sanitation. Moreover wastewater treatments plants and sewage overflows are contributing to AMR in the environment. AMR in relation to decentralized systems however is a scarcely studied topic while a large part of the world population is served by these systems. Septic tanks are used by almost 20% of the urban population globally accounting for more than half of on-site improved sanitation facilities in urban settings. 48% of the rural population uses a form of onsite sanitation. One of the reasons for the scarcity of data on AMR in relation to decentralized sanitation is the variety of systems that are being used and the relative obscurity of their design dimensions and efficacy. This workshop is intended to draw attention to the spread of AMR through inadequate sanitation and to develop a research agenda for decentralized WASH and AMR.


2019-12-02 10:30:00 2019-12-02 12:00:00Asia/ColomboDecentralized WASH Systems And Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR)Decentralized WASH Systems And Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR)Room 4IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Potential Of Intertidal Wetland Sediment As Novel Seeding Biomass For Anaerobic Treatment Of Pharmaceutical Wastewater. Xueqing SHI, China

Chlorine, Peracetic Acid And UV Diisnfection Of Antibiotic Resistant E. Coli Isolates From Wastewater. Cameron Macdonell, Canada

Cross Validation And Database Searching In Microbial Source Tracking. Rifat Ahmed, Pakistan

Assessment Of Electrocoagulation As A Tertiary Treatment In Removing Enteric Pathogens And Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria. Bruno Bicudo, Netherlands


2019-12-02 13:30:00 2019-12-02 15:00:00Asia/ColomboAntibiotic ResistanceAntibiotic ResistanceRoom 4IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Selective Removal Of Trace Hexavalent Chromium By New Class Of Redox-Active Adsorbents From Drinking Water. Renuka Verma, India

Use Of Modified Coal-derived Fly Ash For Di-(2-ethylhexyl) Phthalate Removal From Wastewater. Mahesh Jayaweera, Sri Lanka

Microbial Mediated System For Removing The Aromatic Micropollutant And Bioelectricity Generation. MONIKA SOGANI, India

Investigation Of Cr(VI) Removal Mechanism By Coconut Husk. Renuka Verma, India


2019-12-02 15:30:00 2019-12-02 17:00:00Asia/ColomboTreatment of Emerging ContaminantsTreatment of Emerging ContaminantsRoom 4IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
Room 5

Toilets ≠ Safe Sanitation: Findings From Rapid Assessment Of The Sanitation Situation Of A Neighbourhood In Delhi. Shiny Saha, India

Reinventing The Flush Toilet For Use In The Developing World And Beyond; From A Design Concept To Full-Scale Units. Clement Cid, United States

Sanitation Safety Plan And Its Implementation At Faecal Sludge And Septage Treatment Plant - Warangal, India. RajKiran C A, India

MEDiLOO - Where Technology And Public Health Meet. Damir Brdjanovic, Netherlands


2019-12-02 10:30:00 2019-12-02 12:00:00Asia/ColomboOff-grid toilets and decentralized sanitation technologiesOff-grid toilets and decentralized sanitation technologiesRoom 5IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Chair: Mei Yee Chan, Tuv Sud Psb. Singapore

Invited Speaker: Clement Cid

While many different regulations guidelines and standards exist for water and wastewater treatment technologies and systems there is no international standard that exists for the different types of emerging decentralised sanitation technological solutions that evaluate and benchmark their performance. As technologies advance through innovations standards are required to ensure performance conformity and safety of new products and process. The goal of setting standards is not only to warrant a degree of performance and safety to successfully introduce emerging technologies into the market. These standards provide baseline performance to ensure human health and environmental safety is met to accelerate innovation and acceptance of this new decentralised technology. Scope development stakeholder analysis technology and standards landscaping as well as leveraging on industry best practice tools such as risk assessments were employed to develop the standard


2019-12-02 13:30:00 2019-12-02 15:00:00Asia/ColomboIntroduction To ISO Standards For Non-sewered SanitationIntroduction To ISO Standards For Non-sewered SanitationRoom 5IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Chair: Kamila Galeza, World Bank Group

Developing and managing human resources efficiently is an essential element to improving a water utility's operational and managerial capacity. Many utilities around the world are encumbered by their human resources capacities whether they are under-staffed or over-staffed. Particularly in terms of diversity there is a recognized gender gap in the staffing of most water sector institutions. An International Water Association study based on data from 15 developing countries showed that on average only 17 percent of staff in the water sector regardless of grade or level of responsibility are female (IWA 2014). Similar findings emerge from data derived from IBNET an international benchmarking database which shows that from the 218 utilities that reported on their gender diversity in 2015 on average women make up only 21 percent of total staff. This gap is a concern from an equity standpoint but also points to a larger challenge in a sector that already faces pressure in terms


2019-12-02 15:30:00 2019-12-02 17:00:00Asia/ColomboModernizing Utilities Through Inclusive ApproachesModernizing Utilities Through Inclusive ApproachesRoom 5IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
Room 6

Promoting Water Stewardship In Cities: From Initial Experiences To A Clear Strategy

Chair: Adrian Sym, Alliance for Water Stewardship, United Kingdom

Cities need to create enabling conditions major urban water users to improve water use and work collaboratively to reduce regulatory burdens; water related risks and to increase financial incentives. Approaches such as the AWS Standard provides a credible neutral platform to engage major water users in addressing complex challenges in a way that is connected to the broader catchment. Cities can align water management systems within the city to frameworks such as the AWS Standard thereby setting a leadership example of best practice.

This workshop will draw on some initial thinking and work within diverse municipal contexts to help inform a strategy for accelerating uptake and deepening the impact of water stewardship in cities. This workshop will provide an ideal opportunity to inform and be informed by the IWA professional community into a topic area that has direct and specific relevance to water professionals.


2019-12-02 10:30:00 2019-12-02 12:00:00Asia/ColomboPromoting Water Stewardship In CitiesPromoting Water Stewardship In CitiesRoom 6IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Stakeholder Engagement For Integrated Management Of Water Quantity And Quality In An Ungauged Catchment. Thilini Rajapaksha, Sri Lanka

Quantification Of Water Quality To Practice IWRM Principles In An Ungauged Watershed Of Attanagalu Oya Basin, Sri Lanka. Madhuka Wickramarachchi, Sri Lanka

Incorporating Water Balance And IWRM Principles To Ensure Water Security Of Multiple Users. A. Dahanayake, Sri Lanka

A Diagnostic HEC-HMS Model Development For Water Resources Management In Ellagawa Watershed Kalu River Basin Sri Lanka. Priyani Jayadeera, Sri Lanka


2019-12-02 13:30:00 2019-12-02 15:00:00Asia/ColomboIntegrated Water Resources Management at basin scaleIntegrated Water Resources Management at basin scaleRoom 6IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Chair: Kimberly Lemme, Water for people, United States

Water For People has learned that a plan for water resources management at a district level can lead to increased capacity within the local government to manage track and maintain the reliability of water resources. This workshop will share the experiences in various contexts of a multi-stakeholder approach to water resources management at a district-wide level. This can include multiple watersheds that cross district boundaries or one watershed that serves one district. The methodology and tools used to develop these plans have shown that planning at this level results in a more cohesive understanding of what needs to happen in regards to water resource management as part of achieving SDG 6.


2019-12-02 15:30:00 2019-12-02 17:00:00Asia/ColomboWater Resource Management Planning At The District LevelWater Resource Management Planning At The District LevelRoom 6IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
Room 7

Decentralised Or Centralised Wastewater Treatment In Asia's Megacities -- Understanding Regulatory And Social Barriers

Chair: David Tompkins, SUEZ Advanced Solutions (UK) Ltd, United Kingdom

The rapidly urbanising world faces multiple sustainability challenges. In many contexts there is a growing preference for poly-centric approaches that include nature-based solutions community scale and community-managed systems. Today's objectives are to create climate-resilient enduring self-governing systems -- as well as systems that close the loop encouraging resource re-use and recycling. Barriers to reaching these objectives include inappropriate regulation lack of relevant skills and poor social acceptance.

With its booming urban population highly visible and impactful pollution sanitation and water quality challenges as well as tremendously increasing water insecurity Asia provides huge opportunities for creative approaches to urban sanitation -- but to fully exploit these opportunities will require new policy and regulatory thinking. In this session we aim to identify priorities for a policy paper that addresses the key barriers to uptake of novel wastewater systems.


2019-12-02 10:30:00 2019-12-02 12:00:00Asia/ColomboDecentralised Or Centralised Wastewater Treatment In Asia's Megacities Decentralised Or Centralised Wastewater Treatment In Asia's Megacities Room 7IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Chair: Ambarish Karunanithi, Centre for Policy Research (CPR) India

To highlight the multidimensional nature of the challenge, and sets out recommendations for strengthening existing policies and their implementation in water and sanitation sectors in medium and small sized cities


2019-12-02 13:30:00 2019-12-02 15:00:00Asia/ColomboWater and sanitation-wise secondary and small cities in South AsiaWater and sanitation-wise secondary and small cities in South AsiaRoom 7IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Chair: Alyse Schrecongost, Gates Foundation. United States

"Session will be designed to engage utility staff and economic regulators in a dialogue around the CityWide Inclusive Sanitation Principles, contrasting their current efforts and performance with SDG 6 goals. Participants will spend time considering an “ideal” city sanitation situation and how that compares with their own city.  

Participants will workshop with one another and hear from other cities and regulators about how they have made various systemic changes to improve services, how to better reach low income communities, how to expand revenues, what business models work for delivering services to those relying on non-sewered hardware, etc.


"



2019-12-02 15:30:00 2019-12-02 17:00:00Asia/ColomboCWIS: Urban Sanitation Services For The SDGsCWIS: Urban Sanitation Services For The SDGsRoom 7IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
Room 8

Chair: Giuliana Ferrero, IHE Delft. The Netherlands

The World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended Water Safety Plans (WSPs) a holistic risk assessment and risk management approach for drinking-water suppliers across low- middle- and high-income countries since publishing its 2004 Guidelines for Drinking-Water Quality.

While rapid WSP adoption has occurred capacity is still catching up to implementation needs. Many countries and regions lack case examples legal requirements and training resources for WSPs corresponding to widespread capacity shortfall in the water supply sector.  
We propose a WSP training taxonomy and discuss it in relation to the stages of learning (introduction practice and reinforcement); describe the importance of customizing training to the target group local language and circumstances; highlight the relevance of auditing for evaluating change over time; and call for robust methods to monitor WSP capacity development. 



2019-12-02 :00 2019-12-02 :00Asia/ColomboCapacity Building And Training Approaches For Water Safety PlansCapacity Building And Training Approaches For Water Safety PlansRoom 8IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Chair: Maria Pascual Sanz, UN-HABITAT. Spain

Capacity development interventions are at the core of the sustainable development agenda 2030 and more specifically for the SDG6where there is a target specifically aiming at expanding capacity development support (SDG6.a). Despite this donors tend to impose planning and monitoring frameworks where capacity gets little or no attention and practitioners are not always equipped to adequately reflect capacity outcomes both in the planning and the monitoring activities. Based on the methodology explained in the working paper Pascual-Sanz M. (2019) Granting visibility and fostering capacity outcomes in development interventions GWOPA has developed a web-based platform to support capacity development projects between water operators to plan monitor visualise and report results in a way that capacity outcomes become visible and traceable. The training session will help participants to better understand the limitations of current practice and equip them to overcome them.


2019-12-02 :00 2019-12-02 :00Asia/ColomboHow To Overcome The Invisibility Of Capacity? A Methodology To Better Plan And Monitor Capacity Outcomes In Operators.How To Overcome The Invisibility Of Capacity? A Methodology To Better Plan And Monitor Capacity Outcomes In Operators.Room 8IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
 
2019-12-02 :00 2019-12-02 :00Asia/ColomboBusiness ForumBusiness ForumRoom 8IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Tuesday 3 December

09:00 - 09:45
Coffee Break10:30 - 12:00
Lunch13:30 - 15:00
Break15:30 - 17:00
Break17:15 - 18:30
Room 1 
2019-12-03 09:00:00 2019-12-03 09:45:00Asia/ColomboKeynote PlenaryKeynote PlenaryRoom 1IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
 

Chair: Sara Bosshart, IWA Publishing. United Kingdom

Integral to the catalysis of transformational change in the water sector is the global accessibility of relevant knowledge and innovation. In spite of this only 0.01% of water-related research is openly available to the public. The Open Access movement aims to address this discrepancy granting seamless global access to research outputs and clarity about reuse and application.

This workshop aims to give a broad introduction to Open Access - what it is why it's important (particularly in the developing world) and to give participants necessary tools and tips to publish their own work Open Access and where they can easily discover Open Access content. The workshop also aims to draw on experience and feedback from participants to further adapt future Open Access initiatives to better serve the water community.


2019-12-03 10:30:00 2019-12-03 12:00:00Asia/ColomboOpen Access For The Developing WorldOpen Access For The Developing WorldRoom 1IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
 

Chair: Kizito Maside, IWA


2019-12-03 13:30:00 2019-12-03 15:00:00Asia/ColomboAfrica Leaders ForumAfrica Leaders ForumRoom 1IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
 

Chair: Kizito Maside, IWA



2019-12-03 15:30:00 2019-12-03 17:00:00Asia/ColomboAfrica Leaders ForumAfrica Leaders ForumRoom 1IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
 
2019-12-03 17:15:00 2019-12-03 18:30:00Asia/ColomboPlenary SessionPlenary SessionRoom 1IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
Room 2 

Chair: Harsha Ratnaweera, Norwegian University of Life Sciences. Norway

The future of safe and secure water supply very much depends on the next generation's decision makers engineers and innovators. Therefore it is a valuable investment to ensure the highest possible quality of graduate education in water related subjects at universities in regions across the world. However substantial differences in the quality of education remain in our field. These differences limit the mobility of future graduates and world citizens e.g. in the context of inter-university credit transfers. As a result there is an abundance of good practices we need to identify share and further develop. Hence the Water Harmony workshop is for everyone invested in country- or region-wide water management futures. The session will run with simultaneous translation to Russian.


2019-12-03 10:30:00 2019-12-03 12:00:00Asia/ColomboWater Harmony: Harmonising Graduate Water EducationWater Harmony: Harmonising Graduate Water EducationRoom 2IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
 

Chair: Harsha Ratnaweera, Norwegian University of Life Sciences. Norway

The future of safe and secure water supply very much depends on the next generation's decision makers engineers and innovators. Therefore it is a valuable investment to ensure the highest possible quality of graduate education in water related subjects at universities in regions across the world. However substantial differences in the quality of education remain in our field. These differences limit the mobility of future graduates and world citizens e.g. in the context of inter-university credit transfers. As a result there is an abundance of good practices we need to identify share and further develop. Hence the Water Harmony workshop is for everyone invested in country- or region-wide water management futures. The session will run with simultaneous translation to Russian.


2019-12-03 13:30:00 2019-12-03 15:00:00Asia/ColomboWater Harmony: Harmonising Graduate Water EducationWater Harmony: Harmonising Graduate Water EducationRoom 2IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
 

Chair: Harsha Ratnaweera, Norwegian University of Life Sciences. Norway

The future of safe and secure water supply very much depends on the next generation's decision makers engineers and innovators. Therefore it is a valuable investment to ensure the highest possible quality of graduate education in water related subjects at universities in regions across the world. However substantial differences in the quality of education remain in our field. These differences limit the mobility of future graduates and world citizens e.g. in the context of inter-university credit transfers. As a result there is an abundance of good practices we need to identify share and further develop. Hence the Water Harmony workshop is for everyone invested in country- or region-wide water management futures. The session will run with simultaneous translation to Russian.


2019-12-03 15:30:00 2019-12-03 17:00:00Asia/ColomboWater Harmony: Harmonising Graduate Water EducationWater Harmony: Harmonising Graduate Water EducationRoom 2IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
Room 3

Model-Based Exploration Of Optimal Asset Management Strategies To Minimize Leakages In Water Distribution Networks. Harsha Abeykoon, Netherlands

Burst Detection By Analyzing Shape Similarity Of Time Series Subsequences In District Metering Areas. Shuming Liu, China

Exploring Parameters-leak-energy Interaction In A Water Distribution Network Using Multi-linear Regression Modelling. Dina Zaman, India

The Reduction Of Apparent Loss Due To Meter Inaccuracy In MWA. Teepagorn Chaladtanyakij, Thailand


2019-12-03 10:30:00 2019-12-03 12:00:00Asia/ColomboNRW and leakage detection in Water supply managementNRW and leakage detection in Water supply managementRoom 3IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Chair: Andres Hueso, WaterAid. United Kingdom

Non Revenue Water is a key component of the efficient operation of a water utility. Those water utilities with low NRW are often identified as being the most efficient. In addition having low NRW often results in higher revenues and thus more monies to spend on future NRW management activities. This is often referred to as the Virtuous Cycle of NRW management and it is important for poorly managed water utilities to get on the cycle of improvement as soon as possible.

The objectives of the workshop are to give the participants a general overview of what constitutes NRW its value to the water utility and how to start managing these losses. The round table discussions will help the participants to identify which elements of NRW are more important and which to start managing first and which last.

The workshop is aimed at Water Supply Engineers and Managers who are responsible for managing water supply networks and specifically managing leakage levels and burst repairs.


2019-12-03 13:30:00 2019-12-03 15:00:00Asia/ColomboNon Revenue Water The Basics And How To Start Managing ItNon Revenue Water The Basics And How To Start Managing ItRoom 3IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Chair: Tbc

Building Sustainable Decentralized Models For Safe Drinking Water, Amandine Muret, France

Impact Of Different Domestic Storage Practices On Trihalomethane Levels In Pipe Born Water In Sri Lanka, Nepali Jayasinghe, Sri Lanka

Assessment Of Water Quality And Conditions Of Domestic Storage Tanks, In Central Division, Kampala Uganda, Enoch Makoko, Uganda

Virus Removal By Ceramic Pot Filter Disks: Effect Of Biofilm Growth And Cleaning, Mona Soliman, The Netherlands



2019-12-03 15:30:00 2019-12-03 17:00:00Asia/ColomboOff-grid water treatment technologiesOff-grid water treatment technologiesRoom 3IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
Room 4

Membrane Distillation Performance And Fouling Mechanism In Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater Treatment. Libing Zheng, China

A Novel Approach For Small Scale Reverse Osmosis Plant Brine Using Constructed Wetlands. Sasitharan Ramanathan, Sri Lanka

Innovation In Biological Wastewater Treatment Addressing Lack Of Land, Skilled Labour And Resources In Urban Centres. Subhash Rathnaweera, Norway

INNOVATIVE TECHNIQUE IN BIO MASS SEPARATION IN MECHANICALLY AERATED LAGOONS. Dhanesh Gunatilleke, Sri Lanka


2019-12-03 10:30:00 2019-12-03 12:00:00Asia/Colombo Advance treatment wastewater treatment plants Advance treatment wastewater treatment plantsRoom 4IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Simultaneous Electrochemical Removal Of Ammonia And Nitrate Nitrogen For Industrial Wastewater Effluent. Jing Ding, China

Assessment Of Electrochemical (EC-F) And Advanced Oxidation Processes (PPT) For Various Textile Dyes Treatment. Narasamma Nippatlapalli, India

Parametric And Kinetic Investigations On Segregated Textile Effluent Streams Using Moringa Oleifera Seed Powders. Nitin Singh, India

Strategy And Methods For Identification Of The Priority Control Units In A Large Industrial Production Park. YU Yin, China


2019-12-03 13:30:00 2019-12-03 15:00:00Asia/ColomboWastewater treatment process in industrial effluentsWastewater treatment process in industrial effluentsRoom 4IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Role Of Sludge Rheology In Bio-kinetics Of Anaerobic Digestion: Based On ADM1 Model With Mass Transfer Resistance. Jibao Liu, China

Effect Of Wastewater Centrate Loading On Biomass Growth, Microalgal Harvesting And Biolipid Yield Of Chlorella Vulgaris. Shijian Ge, China

Start-up And Operation Of The Combined Partial Nitritation-Anammox (CPNA) In SBR. Hongyan Wang, China

Effect Of Influent Temperature Variation On Behaviour Of A Floc Blanket And Effluent Water Quality. Wasantha Illangasinghe, Sri Lanka


2019-12-03 15:30:00 2019-12-03 17:00:00Asia/ColomboProcess control in Wastewater Treatment PlantsProcess control in Wastewater Treatment PlantsRoom 4IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
Room 5

Chair: Miriam Otoo, IWMI. SriLanka


Rapid urbanization coupled with an increase in population has caused an exponential increase in demand for sanitation services which many developing countries have been unable to meet. To improve on-site sanitation service delivery sector support requires innovative (business) models enabling policies and incentive systems to advocate and mainstream fecal sludge management (FSM). While sanitation is seldom considered a 'business' the excreta collected in OSS are rich in nutrients organic compounds and energy. Resource recovery can thus allow applying market-based principles on on parts of the sanitation service delivery chain where waste can offer incentives for business development and cost recovery. 

This workshop will offer an opportunity for relevant and interested entities to showcase and discuss concrete opportunities as well as bottlenecks that FSM is facing from an institutional and entrepreneurial perspective highlighting examples of initiatives in developing countries."



2019-12-03 10:30:00 2019-12-03 12:00:00Asia/ColomboSustainable Implementation And Scaling-up Of Fecal Sludge Management Models In Developing CountriesSustainable Implementation And Scaling-up Of Fecal Sludge Management Models In Developing CountriesRoom 5IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Chair: Jayant Bhagwan, Water Research Commission. South Africa

There are some 2.5 billion people in the developing world who do not have access to sanitation and many aspiring to the conventional reticulated sanitation systems which require high investment costs highly trained personnel to design implement and operate the system and adequate access to energy industrial chemicals and water to operate the system. In unserviced rural and peri-urban areas as well as developed areas in the developing and developed world the provision of conventional reticulated sewerage systems with their associated intensive resource inputs is not the best technical option in terms of timeframe required for provision affordability and sustainability. Thus there is an urgent need to develop the next generation of off-grid innovative and novel technological options for sanitation that takes into account available water and energy resources user preferences and variable user population.


2019-12-03 13:30:00 2019-12-03 15:00:00Asia/ColomboCreating A New Non- Sewered Sanitation IndustryCreating A New Non- Sewered Sanitation IndustryRoom 5IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Stimulating Microenterprise Development On The Back Of Sanitation Service Provision Using Social Franchising Principles. Sudhir Pillay, South Africa

Capacity Of WASH Service Providers In The State Of Odisha, India: An Assessment. Nitya Jacob, India

Resolving The Uncertainties In Long Term Planning Of Faecal Sludge Management System: Case Study Of Udaipur (India). Ambarish Karunanithi, India

Challenges And Practices Of Sustainable Decentralized Domestic Wastewater Treatment In China. Dawei Yu, China


2019-12-03 15:30:00 2019-12-03 17:00:00Asia/ColomboSanitation Services Including Fecal ManagementSanitation Services Including Fecal ManagementRoom 5IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
Room 6

Chair: Rory McKeown, WHO. Switzerland

Given the significant volume of climate-related data that is available water and sanitation service providers may face a daunting challenge in accessing and transforming this data into useful information that helps them adapt and build resilience through their planning processes.

This workshop will explore the practical challenges that service providers face in this regard and provide guidance on what type of climate information is needed where to get it and how to effectively integrate this information in to planning processes (with a particular focus on water safety planning the comprehensive risk assessment and management approach which can manage climate-related risks across each step in the water supply chain from catchment to consumer). A number of tools to support this process will be presented seeking participant feedback in an interactive session designed to understand service provider's needs and help shape the development trajectory of future guidance materials.


2019-12-03 10:30:00 2019-12-03 12:00:00Asia/ColomboIntegrating Climate Information In Planning For Safe Water ServicesIntegrating Climate Information In Planning For Safe Water ServicesRoom 6IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Regional Water Management Dependence In The Context Of Limited Water Resources. Svitlana Fedulova, Ukraine

Historical Weather Reconstruction Using Old Documents. Panduka Neluwala, Sri Lanka

Climate Adaptive Physical Remodelling Of Traditional Tank Irrigation System In Lower Palar River Basin, Tamilnadu, India. Radha Krishna Ramalingam, India

Which Components Are Required In A Water Stress Indicator, With Application To SDG Indicator 6.4.2. Davy Vanham, Italy


2019-12-03 13:30:00 2019-12-03 15:00:00Asia/ColomboWater scarcity and droughts management for water safety and security plansWater scarcity and droughts management for water safety and security plansRoom 6IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Towards A Global Day-Zero? Assessment Of Water Supply And Demand Futures In 12 Megacities. Janez Susnik, Netherlands

Integrated Urban Water Resources Management Strategy For The Local Planning Area Of Madurai City- A Case Study. S.R. Thiruchelve, India

Vulnerability Assessment Of Urban Waters In India And Sri Lanka In The Context Of Climate Change, Rapid Urbanization And. Manish Kumar, India

Tools For Urban Water Security Planning And Management. Dinesh Mehta, India


2019-12-03 15:30:00 2019-12-03 17:00:00Asia/ColomboWater security planning and management in growing citiesWater security planning and management in growing citiesRoom 6IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
Room 7

Chair: Naomi Carrard, WaterAid. Australia

Who is responsible for ensuring services reach all? How can I navigate competing demands on limited resources to be an effective leader? What are some practical steps I can take? Effective leadership from practitioners is critical for achieving the SDG 6 vision of services for all. In this session participants will hear unbiased stories from actual leaders in the role of service providers regulators and government agencies that are progressing inclusive service delivery. The session will draw on the latest thinking and experiences translating human rights principles into meaningful actionable approaches for utilities regulators and other sub-national government agencies. This includes (i) IWA initiatives demonstrating the practicality and value of the rights to water and sanitation for utilities and regulators; and (ii) the Making Rights Real approach which applies design thinking and marketing techniques to support local leadership in reaching all.


2019-12-03 10:30:00 2019-12-03 12:00:00Asia/ColomboLeadership For Inclusive Services: Achieving The SDGs Through Rights-based Service Delivery ApproachesLeadership For Inclusive Services: Achieving The SDGs Through Rights-based Service Delivery ApproachesRoom 7IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Social Network Analysis For Mapping Water Governance In A Small Irrigation System In Northcentral Sri Lanka. Liyanage Don Kekulandala, Australia

Pacific Community Water Management Plus: Lessons Learnt From Fiji And The Solomon Islands. Diana Gonzalez Botero, Australia

Megacities Alliance For Water And Climate: A Cooperation Between The Metro Manila & The Metropolis Of Greater Paris. Jean-Didier BERTHAULT, France

The Role Of Reciprocity And Information Sharing In Groundwater Management With Reference To Jaffna Peninsula. Pulendran Tharmendra, Sri Lanka


2019-12-03 13:30:00 2019-12-03 15:00:00Asia/ColomboGood water governance and public participationGood water governance and public participationRoom 7IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

A HydroGIS Tool For Stakeholder Based Solution To Assist Urban Flood Mitigation. Rathnayake Pradeep, Sri Lanka

Technical And Political-Economy Analysis Of Mumbai Floods: Pragmatic Policy And Governance Related Recommendations. Arpit Arora, India

Improving Livelihoods Through Storm Water Management. Joshua Mbonye, Uganda

GIS To Identify Flood Risk Areas In The Downstream Of Kelani River Basin, Colombo. Aslam Suja, Sri Lanka


2019-12-03 15:30:00 2019-12-03 17:00:00Asia/ColomboFloods prevention and managementFloods prevention and managementRoom 7IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
Room 8

Budget Tracking Using The Life Cycle Cost Approach In India. Ruchika Shiva, India

Dynamics Of Inclusion In The WASH Sector, An Example From Uganda. Micheal Jonga, Uganda

The Dilemma Of Achieving SDG 6 Targets Under The Global Water Agenda - Analysis From Dry Zone Oya Basins In Sri Lanka. H.A.H. Jayasena, Sri Lanka

Wetland Cities Label To Achieving SDG Goal 6 In The Mediterranean Bioregion. Najet Aroua, Algeria


2019-12-03 10:30:00 2019-12-03 12:00:00Asia/ColomboMajor challenges achieving SGD6Major challenges achieving SGD6Room 8IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

2019-12-03 13:30:00 2019-12-03 15:00:00Asia/ColomboBusiness ForumBusiness ForumRoom 8IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Chair: Andres Hueso, WaterAid. United Kingdom.

Without occupational health and safety safely managed sanitation services cannot be achieved and public health remains at risk.

Yet sanitation workers involved in pit emptying treatment plant operation sewer maintenance suffer deplorable working conditions and health problems in many countries. Data is often lacking on the workers and their conditions.

The workshop discusses new data and shares experiences of improvements in Africa and Asia and allows participants to reflect on critical next steps to elevate the issue improve the working conditions of sanitation workers and ensure a safe and professionalized workforce that can contribute to universal access to sanitation.


2019-12-03 15:30:00 2019-12-03 17:00:00Asia/ColomboMissing Link In The Sanitation Chain: Health And Safety Of Sanitation WorkersMissing Link In The Sanitation Chain: Health And Safety Of Sanitation WorkersRoom 8IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Wednesday 4 December

09:00 - 09:45
Coffee Break10:30 - 12:00
Lunch13:30 - 15:00
Coffee Break15:30 - 17:00
Break17:15 - 18:30
20:00 - 22:30
Room 1 
2019-12-04 09:00:00 2019-12-04 09:45:00Asia/ColomboKeynote PlenaryKeynote PlenaryRoom 1IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Chair: Sudhir Murphy and Katharine Cross

The community of water professionals has an active innovation landscape which is addressing challenges but also creating new opportunities for managing water wisely, sustainably and equitably. Furthermore in order to meet SDG 6 we need new business processes (such as innovative

finance) to be meshed with new technology and digitalization. The Innovators Platform aims to create bridges across different groups, to accelerate and enable rapid dispersion of new ideas and approaches in the water sector. This is through:

• Providing a channel for the IWA network to showcase innovative solutions to water challenges ;

• Providing a platform which curates and intermeshes innovators from supply to demand (across water systems) to share and catalyse new ideas and approaches for improved water management;

• Being a source of information and reference on innovation for sustainable water solutions in the face of global change pressures.

The Platform aspires to enable change agents to catalyse innovation among various stakeholder groups across the IWA network including:

• Water utilities;

• Regulators;

• Manufacturers/Technology providers;

• Consultants;

• Investors;

• Academics; and

• Institutes/Networks.

One of the objectives of the Platform is to facilitate a series of events that bring together innovators from supply to demand across the water sector that will push forward the spread and uptake of new and alternative solutions to challenges across the waters sector. The WDCE is a key milestone that will enable focus on issues pertinent to emerging economies that can be benefit from accelerated innovation to improve water and sanitation access and quality.


2019-12-04 10:30:00 2019-12-04 12:00:00Asia/ColomboInnovators ForumInnovators ForumRoom 1IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Chair: Sudhir Murphy and Katharine Cross

The community of water professionals has an active innovation landscape which is addressing challenges but also creating new opportunities for managing water wisely, sustainably and equitably. Furthermore in order to meet SDG 6 we need new business processes (such as innovative

finance) to be meshed with new technology and digitalization. The Innovators Platform aims to create bridges across different groups, to accelerate and enable rapid dispersion of new ideas and approaches in the water sector. This is through:

• Providing a channel for the IWA network to showcase innovative solutions to water challenges ;

• Providing a platform which curates and intermeshes innovators from supply to demand (across water systems) to share and catalyse new ideas and approaches for improved water management;

• Being a source of information and reference on innovation for sustainable water solutions in the face of global change pressures.

The Platform aspires to enable change agents to catalyse innovation among various stakeholder groups across the IWA network including:

• Water utilities;

• Regulators;

• Manufacturers/Technology providers;

• Consultants;

• Investors;

• Academics; and

• Institutes/Networks.

One of the objectives of the Platform is to facilitate a series of events that bring together innovators from supply to demand across the water sector that will push forward the spread and uptake of new and alternative solutions to challenges across the waters sector. The WDCE is a key milestone that will enable focus on issues pertinent to emerging economies that can be benefit from accelerated innovation to improve water and sanitation access and quality.


2019-12-04 13:30:00 2019-12-04 15:00:00Asia/ColomboInnovators ForumInnovators ForumRoom 1IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
 
2019-12-04 17:15:00 2019-12-04 18:30:00Asia/ColomboClosing CeremonyClosing CeremonyRoom 1IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
 
2019-12-04 20:00:00 2019-12-04 22:30:00Asia/ColomboGala DinnerGala DinnerRoom 1IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
Room 2 
2019-12-04 10:30:00 2019-12-04 12:00:00Asia/ColomboWORKSHOPWORKSHOPRoom 2IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
 
2019-12-04 13:30:00 2019-12-04 15:00:00Asia/ColomboWORKSHOPWORKSHOPRoom 2IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

2019-12-04 15:30:00 2019-12-04 17:00:00Asia/ColomboWORKSHOPWORKSHOPRoom 2IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
Room 3

TiO2 Facet-dependent Arsenic Adsorption And Photooxidation: Spectroscopic And DFT Study. Chuanyong Jing, China

A Novel Technique Of Algal Control In Lake Intakes. Sujatha Kalubowila, Sri Lanka

Application Of ANN For Modeling Of Adsorptive Removal Of Fluoride By Alumina Cement Granules. ASHOK GUPTA, India

Removal Of C. Raciborskii And Cylindrospermopsins By Flotation Combined With Adsorption Onto Powdered Activated Carbon. Daniel Valencia-Cárdenas, Brazil


2019-12-04 10:30:00 2019-12-04 12:00:00Asia/ColomboAdvance Drinking Water TreatmentAdvance Drinking Water TreatmentRoom 3IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Investigation Of The Parameters Which Affect The Operation Efficiency Of Upflow Sludge Blanket Clarifiers. Dicle Tatar, Turkey

Minimising Disinfection By-product Formation In Drinking Water By Combining Ion Exchange And Coagulation. Pascal Finkbeiner, United Kingdom

Performance Evaluation Of Electro-Biochemical Reactor (EBCR) In Desalination And Removal Of Organic Pollutants. Jegathambal Palanichamy, India

Water Quality Model Simulations For Optimized Design Of Chlorination Processes In A Water Supply System. Vajira Lasantha, Sri Lanka


2019-12-04 13:30:00 2019-12-04 15:00:00Asia/ColomboProcess Control in drinking water treatmentProcess Control in drinking water treatmentRoom 3IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Chair: Katharine Cross, IWA. Thailand

Today water utilities and the populations they serve are facing a range of dynamic regional and global pressures such as climate change population growth urbanization deterioration of urban infrastructure systems and more. The water industry and in particular urban water utilities needs to adapt to respond to these challenges and digital technologies could be transformational in positioning the water sector and their customers for increased resilience.

This workshop will explore how digitalization is reshaping the water sector and enabling urban services to seamlessly connect through their value chain. The workshop will have practical examples of utilities digital journeys exploring how a problem has been sorted how digital technologies had a role in solving the problem what was the business case the barriers that were overcome and the benefits for users obtained.


2019-12-04 15:30:00 2019-12-04 17:00:00Asia/ColomboIncreasing Sustainability And Resilience Through Digitalization Of Water And Wastewater ServicesIncreasing Sustainability And Resilience Through Digitalization Of Water And Wastewater ServicesRoom 3IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
Room 4

Water And Sanitation Asset Management Information System At A National Scale With An Integrated Open Source Solution. António Monteiro, Portugal

A Simple And Rapid Method For Enumerating Escherichia Coli In Wastewater By Measuring -D-glucuronidase Activity. Hisashi Sato, Japan

Soft Sensors - An Efficient And Inexpensive Alternative For Water Quality Monitoring: A Case Study On Biological WWTP. Abhilash Nair, Norway

Modelling Of The Process Of Sewage Treatment By Electrocoagulation Method In The Temperature Conditions. Andrii Safonyk, Ukraine


2019-12-04 10:30:00 2019-12-04 12:00:00Asia/ColomboSmart systems for wwt processes ( monitoring and digital transformation)Smart systems for wwt processes ( monitoring and digital transformation)Room 4IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Chair: Tbd

Faster And Cost Effective Alternatives For Conventional Topographic Surveys For Design Of A Sewer Network: A Case Study, Deshan Abwykoon, Sri Lanka

Receiving Water Quality For Optimal Control Of Combined Sewer Systems, Upaka Rathnayake, Sri Lanka

Research Of Infiltration Basins' Operation Modes , Olha  Shevchuk, Ukraine

Effect Of Digital Elevation Model Resolution On Terrain Attributes In Kelani Basin, Sri Lanka, Aslam Suja, Sri Lanka


2019-12-04 13:30:00 2019-12-04 15:00:00Asia/ColomboSewerage and Urban Drainage System Design and ManagementSewerage and Urban Drainage System Design and ManagementRoom 4IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

The Water-energy-food Nexus In The EU: Analysis Of The Water Footprint Of The EU Energy Sector. Davy Vanham, Italy

Responses Of An Irrigation System For The Anticipated Climate Changes And The Challenge Of Ensuring Water And Food Security. Engiliyage Lakmali, Sri Lanka

Markets For Water: Can Tradable Financial Contracts Make It A Reality. INDRAJANAKA MAHAKALANDA, Sri Lanka

Water Footprint And Virtual Water Trade Of Cash Crops. Sukanya Das, India


2019-12-04 15:30:00 2019-12-04 17:00:00Asia/ColomboWater-Energy-Food Nexus and Virtual WaterWater-Energy-Food Nexus and Virtual WaterRoom 4IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
Room 5

Chair: Tbd


Screw Dewatering Of Faecal Sludge For Non-sewered Sanitation. Edwina MercerUnited Kingdom

Impact Of The Presence Of Humic, Kaolin And CaO On Sewage Sludge Pyrolysis Products W.D. Chanaka Udayanga,  Singapore

Adsorption Behavior Of Backwash Sludge From Waterworks For Iron And Manganese Removal. Huiping Zeng, China 

Incorporating Maceration In Screw Conveyance To Improve Extraction Of Faecal Sludge. Kristin Ravndal, United Kingdom


2019-12-04 10:30:00 2019-12-04 12:00:00Asia/ColomboFecal Sludge Treatment Process (including pathogen disinfection and emerging contaminants)Fecal Sludge Treatment Process (including pathogen disinfection and emerging contaminants)Room 5IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Chair:tbc

What Can We Achieve From Bioelectrochemcial-wetland?. Yaqian Zhao, China

Mixotrophic Algal System For Wastewater Treatment And Recovery Of Energy And Nutrients. Nirmal Khandan, United States

Resource Recovery In Chicago: A Multifaceted Approach. Thomas Kunetz, United States

Analysis Of Faecal Sludge For Fuel Potential In A Water Scarce City, A Case Study Of Jaipur, India. Anil Vywa, India


2019-12-04 13:30:00 2019-12-04 15:00:00Asia/ColomboCo-treatment for resource recoveryCo-treatment for resource recoveryRoom 5IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Characteristic Of Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM) Of Reclaimed Water From Different Sources. Lihua Cheng, China

Impact Of Wastewater Irrigation On Soil, Water And Agricultural Crops In Kathiyanoor Village, Madurai, India. Akshaya S, India

Showcasing Various Possibility Of Reuse By Implementing Different Decentralised Technologies. Bhitush Luthra, India 

Increasing The Water Saving Potential In Water Scarce Regions By An Integrated Industrial-urban Water-reuse Concept. Sonja Bauer, Germany



2019-12-04 15:30:00 2019-12-04 17:00:00Asia/ColomboWater ReuseWater ReuseRoom 5IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
Room 6

Chair: Katharine Cross, IWA. Thailand

This workshop builds on initiatives that connect urban areas and their wider catchments including the Action Agenda for Basin-Connected Cities the FAO Approach to S2S Management and Learning Deltas in Asia Initiative (LDAI). The Action Agenda for Basin-Connected Cities aims to influence and activate utilities cities and their industries to become water stewards (e.g. raising awareness of global water stewardship movement standard an applicability amongst stakeholders) working with basin and catchment organisations. Deltas as an important component in Source sea management the workshop integrates the learnings from Learning Delta Asia Initiative (LDAI) of GWP.

The workshop will focus on the pathways to action that can combine the two approaches and drive both urban and rural stakeholders to integrate their (currently siloed) water management approaches. The workshop will highlight cases and activate thinking on the engagement between cities farms and basin-scale water resources.


2019-12-04 10:30:00 2019-12-04 12:00:00Asia/ColomboBasin-connected Cities: Using The Source To Sea & Learning Deltas Approach For Collaboration With Urban And AgricultureBasin-connected Cities: Using The Source To Sea & Learning Deltas Approach For Collaboration With Urban And AgricultureRoom 6IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Chair: Aparna Sridhar, TNC. United States 

The World Water Development Report 2018 noted that though a tremendous opportunity to invest in nature based solutions (NBS) for sustainable water security outcomes exists it requires moving beyond conventional approaches to water infrastructure planning and investment. NBS can be cost-effective and enhance community safety and quality of life. Solutions can include the restoration of watersheds reducing erosion from arable land management of stormwater runoff or protecting riparian zones which can all contribute to improved water quality and flows.

Water utilities and regulatory authorities can play an active role in supporting the effective design of policy investment and delivery models to address needs and opportunities. The session will showcase case studies and applied tools and methodologies followed by an interactive discussion to shape an action agenda for NBS among utility regulators policymakers and practitioners. 

2019-12-04 13:30:00 2019-12-04 15:00:00Asia/ColomboNature Base solution at Large ScaleNature Base solution at Large ScaleRoom 6IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Xian University of Technology (China), Consortium for DEWATS Dissemination Society (India) and BOKU University Vienna (Austria)


2019-12-04 15:30:00 2019-12-04 17:00:00Asia/ColomboNature Base Solution At Small ScaleNature Base Solution At Small ScaleRoom 6IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
Room 7

Sustainable Management Of Water Supply Systems Using Multi Criteria Models For Service Unit Prioritization. Thotamuna Kankanamalage Kumari, Sri Lanka

Challenges In Achieving SDG 6: Barriers To Water-Access In Mumbai Slums And Coping Strategies Of Slum-Dwellers. Subodh Wagle, India

EVALUATION OF THE EFFICIENCY OF WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS OF DUSHANBE CITY, TAJIKISTAN. Boki Bokiev, Tajikistan

Consumer's Willingness To Pay For The Attributes Of Drinking Water From Common Tap In Jaffna District. Sooriyakumar Krishnapillai, Sri Lanka


2019-12-04 10:30:00 2019-12-04 12:00:00Asia/ColomboWater Service Provision for Low Income ( including tariffs models)Water Service Provision for Low Income ( including tariffs models)Room 7IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Practicing Commercialization: How Small Water Utilities Strive For Commercial Viability. Mireia Tutusaus, Netherlands

Inclusion of Innovative technology in integrated waste management of a city: Case of Bogura, Bangladesh. Digbijoy Dey, Netherlands

Assisting Water Utilities Transform Through Financial Innovation To Reach Those Left Behind. Dwinita Wulandini, Indonesia

Financial Solutions For Achieving SDG 6.1 And 6.2: An End-line Evaluation From A Programme Offering Microloans For Water. Zehra Shabbir, United States


2019-12-04 13:30:00 2019-12-04 15:00:00Asia/ColomboBusiness, financial and investment opportunites in water services and water technologiesBusiness, financial and investment opportunites in water services and water technologiesRoom 7IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

Chair: Lesley Pories, Water.org. United States

Urban water utilities (PDAMs) in Indonesia are mandated by the government to achieve 100% coverage in their operational areas. However insufficient funding from the government and low ability to attract additional resources results in PDAMs having to prioritize which inevitably results poorer neighborhoods being left behind. Moreover in low-income areas where water services are available the ability to connect is dependent upon the ability to conform to up-front payment systems - often a barrier to people who have less savings upon which to draw.

The current financing structure of PDAMs constrains their ability to develop new methods to serve low-income communities. This workshop will provide strategies on capacity-building efforts that include financial innovation and private participation to improve the performance of government-controlled urban water utilities - strategies that utility managers and those that support them can adapt to accelerate their own transformation.


2019-12-04 15:30:00 2019-12-04 17:00:00Asia/ColomboNot A Pipe Dream: Assisting Urban Water Utilities Transform Through Financial Innovation To Reach Those Left BehindNot A Pipe Dream: Assisting Urban Water Utilities Transform Through Financial Innovation To Reach Those Left BehindRoom 7IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org
Room 8
2019-12-04 10:30:00 2019-12-04 12:00:00Asia/ColomboBusiness ForumBusiness ForumRoom 8IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

2019-12-04 13:30:00 2019-12-04 15:00:00Asia/ColomboBusiness ForumBusiness ForumRoom 8IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org

2019-12-04 15:30:00 2019-12-04 17:00:00Asia/ColomboBusiness ForumBusiness ForumRoom 8IWAIWAYWPconference@iwahq.org